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ACE additive content

The online curriculum is composed of:

  • an introduction to additive manufacturing (AM)
  • AM process flow and specific technologies
  • mechanical properties of AM materials – print parameters and design tools
  • new developments and future directions for AM
  • directed energy deposition for metal AM
  • metal powder bed fusion
  • multiple choice quizzes to assess learning and track progress.

Step 1: Introduction to additive manufacturing

  • Download and watch Dr. Compton’s AM module 1 video. (Dropbox access is provided after registration).
  • Complete the Introduction to additive manufacturing quiz.

Introduction to additive manufacturing quiz

Answer the questions.
  • Your contact information

  • Enter your first name. For example, Sally or Joe.
  • Enter your last name (surname). For example, Smith.
  • Enter your school's name. Enter your company name if you are not currently a student.
  • Enter your registration email address. For example, sally.smith@utk.edu.
  • Questions

  • Additive manufacturing (AM) is the fabrication of a part or component through the serial addition of material.
  • There are three general classes/subsets of AM: binder jetting, material extrusion, and powder bed fusion.
  • The first 3D printing patents were filed in the 1980s.
  • The Air Force used AM to make an engine component because the original supplier was too expensive.
  • There was a significant transition from prototyping to manufacturing in the 2010s due to new materials and improvements in AM technology.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

 

Step 2: AM process flow and specific technologies

  • Download and watch Dr. Compton’s AM module 2 video. (Dropbox access is provided after registration).
  • Complete the AM process flow and specific technologies quiz.

AM process flow and specific technologies quiz

Answer the questions.
  • Your contact information

  • Enter your first name. For example, Sally or Joe.
  • Enter your last name (surname). For example, Smith.
  • Enter your school's name. Enter your company name if you are not currently a student.
  • Enter your registration email address. For example, sally.smith@utk.edu.
  • Questions

  • Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is the same as fused filament fabrication (FFF).
  • Warping and delamination are major concerns with thermoplastic material extrusion AM processes.
  • In the FFF process flow demonstration, the layer height and nozzle diameter were increased to improve print quality.
  • Direct energy deposition (DED) processes almost always require finish machining after printing.
  • AM is NOT the solution for everything, but it is very good for those cases where it is the solution.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

 

Step 3: Mechanical properties of AM materials

  • Download and watch Dr. Compton’s AM module 3 video. (Dropbox access is provided after registration).
  • Complete the Mechanical properties of AM materials quiz.

Mechanical properties of AM materials quiz

Answer the questions.
  • Your contact information

  • Enter your first name. For example, Sally or Joe.
  • Enter your last name (surname). For example, Smith.
  • Enter your school's name. Enter your company name if you are not currently a student.
  • Enter your registration email address. For example, sally.smith@utk.edu.
  • Questions

  • Topology optimization and additive manufacturing can be used to design and build complex structures that obtain the best structural performance with minimal mass.
  • The resistance of a material to elastic deformation is characterized by Young’s modulus, E.
  • Print parameters have a small influence on mechanical properties of printed materials.
  • Most printed things using topology optimization are printed using powder bed fusion and material extrusion processes.
  • Numerical design tools and AM are amazing, but still must be treated with some healthy caution.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

 

Step 4: New developments and future directions for AM

  • Download and watch Dr. Compton’s AM module 4 video. (Dropbox access is provided after registration).
  • Complete the New developments and future directions for AM quiz.

New developments and future directions for AM quiz

Answer the questions from the New developments and future directions for AM.
  • Your contact information

  • Enter your first name. For example, Sally or Joe.
  • Enter your last name (surname). For example, Smith.
  • Enter your school's name. Enter your company name if you are not currently a student.
  • Enter your registration email address. For example, sally.smith@utk.edu.
  • Questions

  • Material extrusion AM is very effective at aligning short fibers and is the technology of choice for printing fiber-reinforced composites.
  • Thermoplastics begin to melt at the glass transition temperature.
  • Fiber orientation strongly influences the strength and stiffness of composite materials, and therefore also strongly influences how printed things deform.
  • 4D printing is AM of materials that actuate or change shape after the printing process.
  • The future direction of AM is trending towards multi-materials, multi-functionality through control of architecture and composition at multiple length scales.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

 

Step 5: Directed energy deposition for metal AM

  • Download Dr. Jared’s PowerPoint presentation, select Slide Show mode, and watch the presentation. (Dropbox access is provided after registration).
  • Complete the Directed energy deposition for metal AM quiz.

Directed energy deposition for metal AM

Answer the questions.
  • Your contact information

  • Enter your first name. For example, Sally or Joe.
  • Enter your last name (surname). For example, Smith.
  • Enter your school's name. Enter your company name if you are not currently a student.
  • Enter your registration email address. For example, sally.smith@utk.edu.
  • Questions

  • Directed energy deposition (DED) can use powder or wire feedstocks.
  • Directed energy deposition can produce parts that are dimensionally accurate, very smooth, and with very fine feature details.
  • Programming DED parts can be challenging as available software solutions are not yet mature.
  • Material defects are never a problem in DED parts.
  • Potential steps to follow DED include build plate removal, machining, heat treatment, and inspection.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

 

Step 6: Metal powder bed fusion

  • Download Dr. Jared’s PowerPoint presentation, select Slide Show mode, and watch the presentation. (Dropbox access is provided after registration).
  • Complete the Metal powder bed fusion quiz.

Metal powder bed fusion

Answer the questions.
  • Your contact information

  • Enter your first name. For example, Sally or Joe.
  • Enter your last name (surname). For example, Smith.
  • Enter your school's name. Enter your company name if you are not currently a student.
  • Enter your registration email address. For example, sally.smith@utk.edu.
  • Questions

  • The use of metal powder bed fusion (PBF) is motivated, in part, by its versatility and capability for producing geometrically complex parts.
  • Powder cannot be reused in metal PBF.
  • Powder melting in metal PBF can be performed using a laser or an electron beam.
  • The primary focus in metal PBF is printing. Post-processing steps that follow PBF are not important.
  • Process and material defects can have a significant influence on material properties and final part performance.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.